HOPE ON THE HUDSON:

FARMSCAPE ECOLOGY

FARMSCAPE ECOLOGY ASKS THE QUESTION, CAN FARMING AND WILDLIFE CO-EXIST?

HOPE ON THE HUDSON:

A LIVING RIVER

THE HUDSON HAS ENDURED DECADES OF DAMAGE AND NEGLECT. DESPITE THE MYTH OF A DEAD ECOSYSTEM, THE RIVER LIVES.

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For each threat the Hudson River has ever faced, there’s always been a proportional force working to protect it. A cast of characters ranging from sailors to farmers to citizen-scientists emerge as heroes, tirelessly defending “America’s first river.”  

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For many years, the Hudson River, like so many waterways across the U.S., was treated like an infinite waste barrel, a receptacle for poisonous chemicals and hazardous waste. During the past forty years, thanks to a committed group of environmentalists and their agencies, the river has become markedly cleaner, a far more welcoming place for small business and community investment. However, new threats loom on the horizon once again. 

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For each threat the Hudson River has ever faced, there’s always been a proportional force working to protect it. A cast of characters ranging from sailors to farmers to citizen-scientists emerge as heroes, tirelessly defending “America’s first river.”  

HOPE ON THE HUDSON:

GROWING WITH THE GRAIN

GRAINS STRIVE TO MAKE A COMEBACK IN NEW YORK’S HUDSON VALLEY

HOPE ON THE HUDSON:

RESTORING THE CLEARWATER

THE SYMBOL AND LEGACY OF THE HUDSON ENDURES

MANY STORIES. ONE RIVER.

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PORTRAITS: HUDSON VALLEY FARM HUB

Upstate

by Xhenet Aliu | Photos by Tema Stauffer - The focus of Tema Stauffer’s photographs of Hudson and its neighboring places—Livingston, Germantown, Kinderhook, areas unincorporated or merely unidentified acres along State Route 9—isn’t grandeur. She’s not there to document what’s easy to see. There are pretty things, but they’re not things that have been designated by committee as such. They’re things you drive past, or people you walk away from. Stauffer lingers. That’s significant. It makes me think of a lecture I heard in the summer of 2017 by the author Charles Baxter, which he called “Things About to Disappear”: “In an age of anarcho-capitalism, one of the most subversive of all activities is to remember how things were, and how they felt, and what people did. Such remembering is not nostalgia. This is what it means to be alive at a particular time with a functioning memory.” I would add that it’s not simply remembering what seems significant that’s a radical act; it’s paying attention to what you’ve been trained to ignore.

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LATEST FILMS

FARMSCAPE ECOLOGY

Despite its polluted reputation, the Hudson River is teeming with life. From the tiny Glass Eels to the massive 14 foot long Atlantic Sturgeon, a vital web of life defies decades of oppression. Organizations like Riverkeeper and New Yorks Department of Environmental Conservation use lessons learned from its past as a bustling commercial fishery to its present as a ecosystem in recovery in order to protect its future.

A Living River

Despite its polluted reputation, the Hudson River is teeming with life. From the tiny Glass Eels to the massive 14 foot long Atlantic Sturgeon, a vital web of life defies decades of oppression. Organizations like Riverkeeper and New Yorks Department of Environmental Conservation use lessons learned from its past as a bustling commercial fishery to its present as a ecosystem in recovery in order to protect its future.

Source to Sea

In partnership with volunteer citizen samplers, Hudson Riverkeeper tests select tributaries of the Hudson for fecal-indicating bacteria and other water quality indicators. These samples are [...]

Seeds of Hope

From planting to harvest, follow the St. Regis Mohawk Tribe at Akwesasne, the Hudson Valley Farm Hub and Seedshed as they honor Native American seeds that are at risk of disappearing. Can they [...]